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PEANUTS 101

In the eyes of botanists, peanuts are not true nuts. Scientifically known as Arachis hypogaea, the plants which produce them are legumes, like beans or peas. Curiously, after flowering and pollination, they spread their flower stems into the ground, so that the fruit pods develop underground. This helps to explain the other names peanuts go by such as groundnuts and, in southern states of the USA, by goober—derived from n-guba, a word from the Bantu language meaning peanut.

Peanuts were first cultivated in pre-Inca times in ancient Peru. From South America they traveled quickly to the four corners of the world, first to Africa taken by the Portuguese, to East Asia across the Pacific from Mexico and to North America from Africa. Like potato, cocoa and tomato, groundnuts stand as one of the most important New World foods adopted by the Old World. Today, they are grown both for use in foods and for oil. According to the National Peanut Board, China is the largest producer, followed by India and the US, which accounts for nearly 10 percent of the world’s crop.

Groundnuts, which thrive in both tropical and subtropical climates, are rich in protein (about 30%) and oil (up to 50%), and their nutritional importance (see Nutrition Facts) is vital to the diet of some populations and to the economy of some countries.

Interview with the National Peanut Board

As the world’s third-biggest peanut producer, U.S. peanut farmers hold a definite role in both the country’s economy and its consumers. Inspired by their own responsibility, and the love for peanuts, American farmers from the major peanut-producing states joined forces…

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10 interesting facts about peanut

In the past, peanut helped save the economy of the South, when Alabama’s cotton crop was devastated by the boll weevil. Nowadays, groundnuts are viewed as an essential crop, both for the country’s economy and the planet, not to mentioning…

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10 curious facts about peanut butter

Here are some curious facts about one of American’s most favourite food: 1. Peanut butter as we know today was invented around 1890 by Canadian chemist Marcellus Gilmore Edson. He patented peanut butter in 1884, after conceiving a paste with…

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The brilliant mind of the man who loved peanuts

George Washington Carver was born in Diamond Grove, Missouri around 1864. A frail, sickly child, Carver was unable to work in the fields, so he did household chores and gardening. He was left with many free hours to wander the…

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Peanuts Nutrition Facts

Peanuts are source of at least two important nutrients which are good for your health: fat and protein. Because of their high content in fat (up to 50%), they can be classified as oilseeds—like sunflower seeds and flax seeds—and stand…

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Peanuts in the world

Peanuts are grown in tropical and subtropical countries both for their nutritional value and economic importance. A rich plant-based source of oil and protein, they are eaten in many forms, used as an ingredient in savoury recipes or incorporated in…

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How Long Does Peanut Butter Last?

Pasokin is proudly free of conservatives and artificial flavors, and can be stored at room temperature up to three months. This means you can carry our delicious PB bites in your backpack or tuck it in your office drawer for…

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What is Powdered Peanut Butter?

What Is Powdered Peanut Butter?

Powdered peanut butter is made by pressing the oil out of peanuts, then grinding them into a fine powder. That’s all there is to it. You can add a little water to make it the consistency of peanut butter you’re…

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What is Paçoca?

Paçoca (Pah-so-Kah) is a popular Brazilian snack. In Tupi it means, “to crumble with hands,” and originally referred to preparing meat and flour with a wood pestle. Peanuts were introduced to the recipe due to the abundance and nutritional value…

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What Causes Peanut Allergy?

What Causes Peanut Allergy?

Peanut allergies are one of the most widespread food allergies in the United States today, and nearly 3 million Americans are not able to consume peanuts because of allergic reactions [1]. Despite widespread allergies, peanuts account for almost two-thirds of all…

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